Home > Common Ear Conditions > Pressure Sores and the Ears

Pressure Sores and the Ears

By: Jo Johnson - Updated: 23 May 2014 | comments*Discuss
 
Pressure Sores Ear Skin Sores Symptoms

Not commonly the first part of the body to spring to mind when the term ‘pressure sore’ is mentioned, but it is however an extremely vulnerable part of the anatomy and one that is at risk of developing a pressure sore and also an area that is often overlooked or neglected by both patients and carers alike.

What Is A Pressure Sore?

Pressure sores or ulcers, are wounds that develop as a result of damage to the tissues. Often they begin as a small patch of reddened skin that gradually worsens until the skin breaks and the lower layers of tissue are affected. If these are not treated and prevented, they can deteriorate quite severely and deepen until they reach the deep tissues or even down to the bone in the worst cases.They occur as a result of blood flow restriction and as the name suggests, this is most often because of pressure to that area. This pressure is commonly caused by being in the same position for too long allowing the affected area long periods without any proper circulation. This causes blood cells and oxygen to not reach the area allowing the tissues to deteriorate.

As they can occur quickly and can be difficult to heal, the medical professions are very strict concerning pressure sore prevention and have many assessment tools and preventative measures in place to avoid their occurrence.Along with these measures there is also a wealth of health information surrounding the subject for those who care for dependents at home.

What Are The Symptoms Of A Pressure Sore?

The first symptom of a pressure ulcer developing is a red area appearing to the skin. These superficial skin sores can quickly breakdown revealing a raw wound which over time may ooze fluids or pus. Quite often there is not a great deal of pain associated with the sore as the area may be void of a nerve supply as it has broken down with the tissues. However, ulcers that appear on some parts of the body can remain very painful.

Why Are The Ears At Risk Of Developing Sores?

The ears are not commonly known to be an area that is prone to pressure sores, but in actual fact they are more common than the general public think.They are frequently seen in those who remain bed-ridden for long periods, especially those in hospital, and in particular, those who receive oxygen therapy through a face mask that is held in place by a strap that passes round the ears and back of the head.

They may also occur in those who wear spectacles that are ill-fitting and are too small around the ear pieces.Anyone can be at risk of a pressure sore but those who are most at risk include the elderly, diabetic sufferers, those with vascular disease and those who have reduced mobility.

Preventing Pressures Sores On The Ears.

Pressure sores can easily be avoided in many circumstances with the most important factor being mobility, it is important to make sure that the body’s position is changed frequently. In those who rely on the care of others, this should be done at least every two hours.

For those wearing face masks of have other equipment that may cause a sore to develop on the ear, padding should be applied, the area relieved of the pressure every two hours and the area inspected for damage frequently.Where possible, other forms of equipment should be used or alternated so that the same tissues are not put at risk all of the time.

Any one who wears glasses should make sure they have had them fitted by their optician who can make slight adjustments making each set of frames suitable for each individual wearer.The most important preventative measure for everyone else is to make sure their tissues are not compromised in any way and this can be achieved by not smoking, making sure enough water is drunk and to get plenty of fresh air and exercise encouraging oxygen levels in the body to be rich.

Pressure sores, although not often thought of as being associated witch the ears, can occur on these areas and be very difficult to dress, treat and heal properly.As with most disorders and complaints, prevention is always better than cure so measures should be taken to ensure they are not in any immediate risk of tissue damage.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
[Add a Comment]
hey my babies i was wodering if you want a bit of "attention". Maybe a little play with my ear sore will get you into the sexual mood that I desire. sometimes i wonder if my loneliness makes me crazy but i think im just coooooooooooooooooooooool. P.S i have AIDS
Joey Bhoy - 23-May-14 @ 2:58 PM
I have sore to my earlobe right in the center of my lobe, very painful and want to know how to get ride of these's. It keep breaking open an ozze with pus and blood. once it heals a bit then comes back. also dark color to the area and I have a short hair cut so I have to put makeup so people wont see it, would love so help thank you.
mzcine - 26-Sep-11 @ 10:11 PM
My elderly mother has developed painful sores on the outside of hears, she does have severe back pain, so it is probably from loss of mobility while sleeping or resting. Is there anything we can do for this? Sometimes she can't even sleep because it hurts to put her head on a pillow.
Judy - 17-Jun-11 @ 8:50 PM
Is it possible for an 18 month old to get a pressure sore on his ear after a 2 hour journey asleep in a car seat, as my grandson did not have a mark on his ear before the journey but after waking him he was hot and sweaty on his face and neck where he had slept over to one side, we also noticed a small purple mark and a line down the outside of his ear we can only assume it was from the car seat and his position, we wondered if he had slept on it bent or is a pressure sore possible?
worried_granny - 27-May-11 @ 10:42 AM
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice...
Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Topics
Further Reading...
Our Most Popular...
Add to my Yahoo!
Add to Google
Stumble this
Add to Twitter
Add To Facebook
RSS feed
You should seek independent professional advice before acting upon any information on the EarHelp website. Please read our Disclaimer.